HR Learner in Development

Posts Tagged ‘Procedural

A recent issue of Parents Magazine published an article about maternity leaves and the importance of knowing your rights under the Family Medical Leave Act, or as most would call FMLA. As both a mother recently returned from my maternity leave and the point person for Leave Management for my Division, I could not agree with the need for this type of reminder more. So I hope you don’t mind me piggy-backing to spend a little time discussing leave management.

My role leave management role withing the Division sounds simple.  Track people’s leaves.  Mark leaves accurately in time sheets.  Process any actions related to pay changes in our HR Information System.  Where it gets complicated is when people don’t follow policy, don’t know that they can take leaves, or don’t know that they actually have to let us when when they return.

For just a little bit of information on FMLA, it protects an individual’s job from being taken away if he or she needs to take some time away from the office to tend to a medical condition, for self or for a family member.  Every company with at least 50 employees working within a 75 mile radius (the specifications get more granular than this but I don’t want to bore you) must grant 12 weeks of unpaid protected time to any employee who has worked at least 12 months and1,250 hours within the last 12 months before the leave.  This protects individuals who are out for a continuous amount of time (surgery and recovery, including delivery of a child), as well as intermittent time (regularly occurring symptoms & scheduled doctors visits to treat).  While every company falling under the guidelines must give this time by law, some go above and beyond to allow some, all, or even more than this time to be paid time.

Other laws, like the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) protect disability leaves, and require organizations to provide reasonable accommodations to those with disabilities, including extending potential leave time.

In HR, we need an accurate picture of who is out and when so that we can have each individual paid correctly, as well as to potentially provide support to any department in need of additional assistance.  In all honesty, we do not need to know why an individual is out, and sometimes it is better if we don’t know, but we do need to know how it affects the work that the individual does on a daily basis.  Therefore, it is important that we receive doctors notes, not to police, but out of concern for the healing individual.  We want to see proof that the individual is ready to return and able to do the job they were assigned, and if there are any tasks that an individual can still not do as a result of their recovery or continued impairment, we need to not take any retaliatory actions against the employee for not doing what they used to be capable of doing.  No, we don’t want to get sued, but we also really want the employee to be healthy and well, too.

Not all leaves are created equal, but tracking them all is very important


It is also true, however, that people can take advantage of company leave policies.  It then becomes important to know when an individual was out, whether it was protected or unprotected time, and whether they followed the procedure for requesting and notifying the proper people at the right times in order to determine whether coaching conversations or disciplinary actions need to take place.

Ultimately, the organizations that respect individuals leaves will see a better uptick in loyalty from those people who took leaves.  The more generous a leave policy is, though, does not translate to greater and greater loyalty.  There must be a line where employees know they can not take advantage of the organizations generosity.  Organizations benefit from healthy workers.  But unhealthy workers can benefit from being under the wing of a healthy organization.

Take some time to review the leave policies in your department, organization, state, and federal area.  What you find may give you peace of mind, or may show you where you can help illuminate a potential growth area.  Stay healthy! But if you can’t, know your rights.

To return next week

Thank you for being patient. I will return.

I would like to take a moment to express my joy in returning to my blog.  The past few months have taken a mental and emotional toll on me both at work and home, but there is a light at the end of the tunnel. I hope to return to a more regular posting schedule, as was planned at the beginning of the year, and I hope those who have been interested in what I have had to say will pick up the pieces with me.

Over the past few months I have had to focus all of my energies on my work.  I have hit some hurdles and reached a stride.  I have some new ideas on posts I can use in the future, and I look forward to sharing what I have learned.

Until that point, thank you for sticking around.  I intend to have smoother sailing from now on.

Waiting for that phone call from a possible employer can be painful, and so can waiting for a response from a perspective employee. Give each other a break and respect the other's time and effort in the recruitment/interview process.

So you’ve been fired. . . just kidding (you know what I’m talking about if you read my most recent post at http://wp.me/pOkV2-19).  Due to the recession, a lot of people are still out of jobs going in to the new year. Other’s have been in the same roles for longer than anticipated because the applicant pool is much more experienced than has been in the past.  This may or may not continue on to the new year.  So if you are in the market for a new job, I have a few things to say.

Don’t waste the employer’s time and don’t waste your time. Go forward with defined goals and objectives for what type of role you are looking for in a set of companies or industries you would be comfortable.  While the best match tends to be for a role equal to or just above the one you are leaving within a similar company or industry, many jobs have cross-functionality across industries.  Look at your strengths, hopefully attached to behaviors and tasks you have completed in the past, and look at what you would like for yourself in the future.  Going from there, search for jobs you are qualified for.  Actually read the job description and most if not all job qualifications.  In an environment like this one, you are most likely to land an interview if you are partially overqualified for the role.  Don’t get disheartened if this is not you.  Again stick to your strengths and let them shine.

One piece of advice for the average job posting website is to really go through and label your priorities within the jobs you are qualified for.  A – Would really love this job.  B – I could do this job.  C – I can do it, so just give me the money.  Discard all C level jobs.  You don’t need to limit yourself to being tortured day in and day out with a tiring meaningless job if you don’t need to.  Apply to A’s and B’s.  If offered an interview for a B level category, take a little bit of time assessing if you could be happy in this job or with this company.  If the answer turns out to be no, don’t waste the company’s time and don’t waste your time.  While a practice interview could be benficial here or there, practice with a friend, not with a department who may in fact actually want to work with you.  You don’t need to string them along.

Employers.  Same goes for you.  I’ve seen several instances of ‘pity’ interviews.  Some of them actually pan out, but most of them don’t.  If you are going to take the time to bring someone in for an interview, even if you think someone else may be more qualified on paper, you must give them a fair and even shot.  The trick here is that interviewers are instructed to ask the same questions to all candidates.  You should not short change the guy who rubs you the wrong way, unless you truely fear for your well being of course.  If you get a sense from the candidate that they don’t want to be there, or they don’t really want the job, ask them!  You may be surprised by what you hear, and you might end up saving some time.

Let me bring you back to a job interview I had once.  I was looking for a job which would teach me more about Human Resources.  The job listing was for a Recruitment Coordinator.  I applied and was called in.  Getting to the office, I quickly began to see that this recruitment agency was heavily sales oriented.  Now I had previously had a short span of sales experience and enjoyed the work.  The atmosphere seemed to be very similar to that sales job I had held, and I could feel the energy in the room.  However, I wanted to learn something new.  Recruitment as sales wasn’t what I had had in mind for this next step in my career.  In the interview room, the interviewer asked why I wanted the job, almost right away, and I told him point blank, “I see that this is a very sales based job and that’s not what I’m looking for right now.”  He appreciated my honesty, and appreciated me not wasting his time.  He was able to get back to what was surely a busy day on the phone with companies and in person with candidates.  Together, we saved eachother time.

On a side note, employers, if you know that you are not going to go ahead with a particular candidate, let them know as soon as you can.  Don’t let them wait in limbo, assuming the job is still available to them.  Give them a fair chance to get moving onto the next application process.  Give them a call, shoot them an email, write them a letter.  Thank them for their time.  And let them get on with their lives.

Don't let this be you (giving or receiving end). Work towards better communication to improve productivity and value within the next year.

Going ahead into a new year gives rise to annual reflection and resolution.  For my blog, this means trying to stick to a more regimented schedule as many of you will notice, my posts are quite sporadic.  So I am taking up the Post a Week 2011 Campaign.  Call me out on it if you see me slipping!

In business, one of the most important reflections any boss or employee needs to make is that of efficiency, effectiveness, and productivity.  How can you as an individual make changes in the upcoming year to improve your performance and your business? Employers of course will look at their employees and determine how to better lead their people.  But what happens if expectations are not being met?  I implore  boss and employee alike to take a hard look at what can be improved and when it might be time to move on.

The choice to fire is of course a difficult one.  Most employers will say that it is one of the hardest things they have to do in their job and or career.  Many in fact avoid firing due to the stress of putting someone else out, or they make excuses that there are workarounds to the short comings of an unproductive employee.  Yet as a whole, the working environment may be better off without those problem employees.

Some of the signs that an employ may be better off working elsewhere include:

  1. Lethargic Work Behaviors
  2. Negative Attitude and/or Talk Back
  3. Policy Violation(s)
  4. Continued inability to perform

I’ll go into each to discuss the impact on the business, what a boss can do, and what an employee can do to correct the negative situation before things go too far.

1. Lethargic Work Behaviors – This could be systematic of a number of work related or non-work related (sleep deprivation, illness, etc) circumstances, but it clearly has an impact on productivity.  Lethargy or a slow, tired dredge through the work day can most seriously be a sign of a disengagement; the employees lack of interest in what they are doing and why.  Managers must have a serious discussion with individuals who present these behaviors.  Maybe the employee has lost sight or never truly knew where they fit within the organization or why their role is important.  Managers need to remind these people of where they create value.  On the other hand, if the employee knows exactly how he or she fits into the organization and is unmotivated by it, a change is needed.  Whether that change happens within the organization or outside of it depends on the need of both organization and the employee.  If a supervisor comes to you saying that they have notice lethargic behaviors, try to ask them how long they expect certain tasks to take; your boss may have unrealistic expectations of what your job entails.  Work with your boss to set a plan of overcoming the hurdles of your everyday tasks.  What can be done differently on your end?  What can be done differently by the manager to help you accomplish your job responsibilities?

2. Negative Attitude and/or Talk Back – While many don’t realize,  a negative attitude is cancerous to an organization.  This issue really needs to be addressed least the negative attitude of the problem employee spills into the mindset of other workers.  This could be anything from back talk with a manager or supervisor which calls question to that supervisor’s legitimacy, to bashing a product, to being generally uncooperative. For a manager to not address these issues makes it acceptable both for that individual to continue those behaviors, but also makes it acceptable for others to do the same.  This creates a negative work environment, and engagement suffers  significantly.  Managers, take the time to speak to the problem employee and let them know that these attitudes should be corrected.  If you know you are one of these problem employees, ask yourself why.   Do you not respect the people or the work you are doing?  If not, consider other options.  Don’t risk being called out.  If there are no other options for you, seriously consider the alternative of being out of a job because of your behavior.  Can you afford it?  Don’t take it for granted that you will always get away with your poor attitude.  If at all possible, try to turn it around.  If you can’t speak to your supervisor about it directly, try turning to HR to get some suggestions on turning yourself into an employee you and your organization can be proud of.

3.  Policy Violation – The seriousness of a policy violation varies, but on every account, these violations should be handled equally across the board for all employees.  Some policy violations certainly create an imperative to fire instantly, after the violation has been confirmed.  Some examples include discovering ineligibility, violation of a harassment policy and breach of contractual agreements.  Other policy violations may be less severe.  If an employee breaks a certain one of these lesser policies, it is the responsibility of the supervisor or manager to let that employee know what was done and to punish accordingly.  There are some cases where an employee legitimately is unaware of the policy, so the manager must make sure that everyone is on the same page going forward.   On the employee end of the matter, be sure to read the policy manual (if it exists).  There may be an organization policy, area policy, and/or department policy.  Be sure to follow each and every one.  If they conflict be sure to bring it up with your manager.  If you recognize that you have violated a policy, be aware and don’t do it again!  This is one of the easiest ways to lose out on promotion, credibility, or your job.  Work with your manager on rebuilding trust.

4. Continued Inability to Perform – Legally, an employer would be wise to fire in this instance only if they have gone through clear and detectable steps towards working with the employee to correct problem behaviors. That being said, progressive discipline is generally the best route in most situations (baring the instant fire situations previously mentioned within policy guidelines).  In order for progressive discipline to work, it must be done for all situations for all employees, favored or problematic.  Progressive discipline is often set forth by the organization itself, but if not, the general gist is simple.  An employee does something wrong, the manager discusses it with the employee and takes note of date, instance, and what was said on both sides.  Some form of punishment may be put in place.  If an employee continues to do something wrong, the manager again discusses the issue with the employee and escalates the punishment, also bringing it to the attention of an additional set of ears and eyes, usually in Human Resources.  Again, the manager writes down what happened, when the discussion took place and what was said.  Finally, if the behavior continues, the manager would most likely have the grounds to fire as soon as the instance was properly confirmed.  The manager should always consult with Human Resources before making these termination decisions.   The number of instances most depends on a policy set in place by the organization, but if not, should be consistent with the needs of the organization.  If you are on the employee end of this, take every effort to turn things around early.  If you feel like you are being singled out, bring it to Human Resources, or if all else fails, a lawyer.  No one should feel like they are being treated differently for anything relating to race, gender, national origin, disability, religion, or retaliation.  For more information, consult the EEOC (US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) website.

One final situation of note is the instance of the loyal, previously star performer who has been promoted to a role he or she is unable to perform.  Please keep in mind that these individuals are an asset to your organization, but if they are not meeting the basic requirements of their new role, should be scaled back.  Manager, this must be done tactfully.  Employees who have been promoted have probably gotten used to the fact that they are going to hold on to that role for a long period of time.  Remind your employee of the job responsibilities, and refer to the job description.  Employee, try to not take offense, you should have seen this coming.  Either find a way to work with your manager to improve the skills you lack for your new role, or graciously accept that this current role is not for you.  I know there are many companies who will then manage the individual out of the organization, but again, you may be surprised to find this employee shine in another role entirely.

Firing should be a last resort, but if done properly could prove to be in the best interest of the organization, the supervisor, the team, and even the individual being let go.  Here’s to 2011, a year of clearer communication, a greater sense of purpose, higher levels of respect, and overall improvement.

Peak periods are the ideal times to discover inefficiencies and revitalize the way you do the same old tasks.

One of the easiest ways to spot inefficiencies is to analyze peak time transactions.  During the busiest time of the year, it is especially noticeable what processes take the most time and perhaps what wastes the most time.  It is during these periods of extra work when it is crucial to take a step back and try to think of ways in which to complete the work better.

This of course is easier said then done.  Work done in peak times are not often accompanied with many periods for innovative thought or development.  However, managers can lead this innovative thought by making it a priority for the team, and insuring time for experimentation.

While it may not be prudent to implement widespread experimentation during the peak period, small-scale experimentation may lead to a vital change which could impact speed and accuracy of peak time processes.

Therefore, managers should make it a priority to give their team members the room for experimentation. I read recently in the Harvard Business Review about the function of the boss as a human shield.  I agreed wholeheartedly with the article (“The Boss as Human Shield” by Robert I. Sutton, Sept. 2010).  By limiting the demands of both the manager and outside leadership, customer demands, and other departmental distractions, the manager is in a key position to insure that his or her people can focus and experiment on these side projects, which can surely lead to the improved functioning of the department/organization.

Depending on the function of the department, managers can limit interruptions by sending calls to voice mail, turning off internet or email receiving functions, offering to close access to the public early or open it late so that staff can work in peace, and a number of other options.

Of course, innovation in peak time can not be completely separated from peak time responsibilities. One strategy that I have found useful is to set aside a certain amount of time over the course of the week just to focus on the special project at hand. Seeing as people will likely not be able to brainstorm, experiment, and implement in a short period of time in one session, breaking it up in short bursts not only accomplishes gradual progress on a large project, but it also insures time for breaks, allowing the experimenters to come back to the project with fresh eyes, a fresh perspective, and potentially additional information about the problem that they may not have had before.

The busiest time of the year can be a time where people pound their heads against the wall, complaining about how lengthy, complicated, or stressful the overall tasks of the time can be, or it can be a time where people create strategies of ways to improve those tasks. In my humble opinion, encouraging the team to take those times as opportunities for improvement is definitely the path to take.

While thinking about the culture of your organization may seem a no brainer, starting the conversation can be quite puzzling.

Culture, as dictionary.com puts it, is defined in part by  “the behaviors and beliefs characteristic of a particular social, ethnic, or age group: the youth culture; the drug culture”.  Every business, company, branch, department or any subsection of an organization has a culture of its own.  Thinking strategically, the organization’s culture should trump all other subgroups in a way that creates a coheisive culture for the whole.  Of course different branches or departments could have different ways of carrying out what needs to be done, as they should.  However, making a coheisive culture throughout is a bit more complicated.

But how is a company’s culture formed?  Following best practices, the culture should come out of the strategic plan for the organization.  If you don’t have a strategic plan, business plan, or other company goals, now would be the time to rethink your business strategies.  Take the time to understand your business and the needs of your clients. From there, you can determine what sort of people and what sort of behaviors fit within your organization.

Most of all, actions speak louder than goals. It’s great for a strategic plan to have lofty ideals of why the company was founded and where it’s headed.  It’s quite another for business leaders within the company to take some actions to bring those goals to fruition.

But honestly, does the strategic goal make sense?  I mean that in two ways.  First, does it set forth goals that fit with what your company is all about?  Does it address the needs of the organization and the services that it provides? It is important that these questions are asked not only once but on a continuous and routine basis, so that as the company’s need changes, so too will the goals change to fit it, along with the company practices. Second, do people know what the heck it’s trying to say. Strategic plans need to be clear, concise, and understandable to everyone.  Not only that, but the plan needs to be reachable by everyone.  Without theplans being widespread throughout the hieght and breadth of the company, there is no chance that the goals will actually be acheived in any manageable way.

So what kinds of actions need to take place to bring the strategic plan to life? These ideas can and should come from anyone who works in the company, but the final call falls to the leadership of the company. Just thinking, however, about all aspects of a business, the strategic plan should have a grasp on processes all throughout the organization.  The following is just a short list of the many which need to be closely tied to a company’s strategic plan:

Recruitment and Hiring Decisions

Retention Practices

Advertising and Marketing

Research and Development

Company Metrics

Promotion and Compensation Decisions

Learning and Development

Overall Policy Decisions

Of course I am missing many, but I hope to be able to touch upon many of these in future posts.  I have reviewed my Division’s strategic plan, framed it in work conversations, and analyzed it some more with additional reading on my own, and I wish to impart a little of what I have found.

Forecasting snow creates a little more than meets the eye for a business.

A good part of the western coast, and then some, has gotten a taste this winter of the joys and perils of the snow day.  States that rarely see a snowflake in a lifetime have been under inches of snow, and others have seen a bit more than is usual.  Schools close, businesses shut down, and some not all at once.

I know nothing of a corporations take on such a day because my experience is based solely at a university.  I can only relay information that I have seen and heard with my own eyes and ears, and to me, when there is a blizzard, for the most part, people don’t come to work, or they leave early.

This tends to provide conflict. It is important that Human Resources staff and company leadership are keeping eachother in the loop.  By extension, the role of Human Resources during these situations is to keep employees informed, especially if the company is service oriented. 

In doing so, it is important for the Human Resources Professional to understand what the needs of the clients (both employees and non-employees) are.   Of course, a big part of considerations is insuring the safety of your employees.  Travel concerns may delay both incoming and exiting commutes, so extra time may be required to prepare for the day.   Are services provided for the company needed by the outside public during a storm?  If so, are all staff members needed?  Can the services be provided by an essential staff skeleton crew? 

Other needs have a broader scope.  Snow can cause schools to shut down which requires parents to take extra measures to have proper care available for their children and other dependents.   

All in all, employees, and clients, need to know what is to be done as soon as possible so that they can make arrangements, and HR’s role is to facilitate that communication.   

One danger lies in that fact that most people begin to speculate.  Some rumors may start up and most will be shrugged off.  Some may stick.  Human Resources must take each of these speculations in turn.  If they hear that someone ‘heard’ that a decision had been made, it is their job to communicate otherwise,hopefully as far as that rumor ran.  It is HR’s next step then to find where the person got that false intel, who else was around when they heard, when it happened, and what the exact message entailed.

As soon as a decision has been made, whether business will stop or it will operate as usual, the Human Resources Professional should set communication in motion, however that person sees fit.  This should reach all employees, not just managers or department heads.  There is always a danger that a silo of information exists and not all employees get the message.  Human Resources should try to the best of their ability to make sure that silo does not exist.

It is important to work quickly on this or people may begin to get upset and think that the company is withholding information to their detriment.  Therefore, again, it is essential that steps are taken as soon as there is concrete information.

When the announcement goes out, this question remains – how will people be paid?

Whenever possible, it is a good idea to have this question answered before an announcement goes out.  Even before that.  This question should be answered before the emergency event presents itself, in this case detrimental snow.  Two main situations arise – those who work partial days, and those who don’t work.

Partial: How should your non-exempt, hourly employees be compensated?  Will they be paid out for an entire days work if they worked the morning only to be sent home in the afternoon?  If an employee remains as a part of an essential services skeleton crew, will he or she be compensated straight time, or over time?

Absence: Are snow days considered holidays?  Will people be paid full days?  Will they need to use a vacation or personal day in order to be paid, if available?  If an employee is supposed to work the afternoons and does not show up for his or her shift, will they be eligible to be paid, when others did work?

After the event occurs, depending on your payroll processes, a lot of time may then be required to go back and edit time.  This can be very time consuming, but it is necessary that people are all taking the events into account in their timesheets/logs.  Inaccuracies and inconsistancies are not acceptable.  As always, Human Resources should make no exceptions, and they should take the time to see that they are keeping to their word. 

Like all other emergency scenarios, actions and answers should be in place before situations and questions arise.  The problem with emergencies is that they always bring questions before answers are divulged.  The best actions you can take are to have all possible information ready, even if that means saying “Please be patient.  We will get back to you when we know more.”