HR Learner in Development

Posts Tagged ‘Library

Books are not the only resource in an academic library. The talent management process of librarians is vital to the success of the student body.

I recently finished reading “Talent Management: Cases and Commentary” as edited by Eddie Blass and found it to hold an exercise that I could produce for the organization that I work in.  As it is structured, the book goes through several talent management philosophies and processes from several different organizations.  Following are the results I deduced for an academic library.  Feel free to flush out the talent management structure of your company by following the same structure.

For the purposes of shared understanding, ‘talent’ as it applies to those individuals deemed as potentials for organizational leadership and success.

Talent Dimensions:

Size of Talent Pool –  In some organizations the talent pool can be quite large, but for the University Library, talent is limited primarily to the librarian roles, which is where I will focus my analysis.  Of the near 300 full-time employees working within the Division in staff, administrative, and technical positions, only 10% are the faculty talent.

Entry Criteria – Becoming a librarian within the Division is determined with great scrutiny.  The interview process alone has several stages where an individual must complete a rigorous interview process and present their current research and how it relates to the librarian position available.  The rate of entry seems to be roughly 1% for every librarian role.

Decision Process – The search committee initially determines entry into the Library Assistant rank.  A search committee can range from 4 to 8 individuals with vested interest in the success of the role.  On top of the search committee, the candidates are approved by both the Division’s Director of HR as well as the Dean of the library.  Reaching the Assistant level and Associate Curator level requires additional scrutiny by tenure track faculty members.

Permanency of Definition – The talent pool is not completely permanent here.  If a librarian is not staying current within the field or is not publishing (publish or perish) they will not move on in the ranks and will be managed out.

Recruitment as a Source of Talent – Talent can be recruited from both internal and external candidates.  The percentages for the past three years has shown roughly 20% internal and 80% external in placing librarians, although once in the librarian roles, these individuals may expand their responsibilities beyond the specialty they were brought on to advise in.

Transparency – The talent management process is made clear to all faculty members.  The Division aims for transparency in this and all other processes.

Development Path – The career path for the librarians is laid out with specific guidelines and milestones.

Development Focus – The focus at the library is on the strengths of our librarians.  As a leading academic library, our librarians need to be current and at the top of their field which demands a high degree of specialty within their subject areas.

Support – Support comes from the organization and within the talent pool.  The atmosphere is collegiate, so knowledge-sharing and collaborative innovation are the norm.  Talent is allowed leave in order to work on further research and they are supported financially while travelling to area-relevant conferences.

Influence on Career – At the end of the day, it is up to the individual to put in the effort to remain current and on top of their field.

Connected Conversations – Our librarians can speak to line managers, directors, and HR for suggestions on conferences or other ways to further their own personal research or publishing.

Organizational Values – The organization values supportive teamwork and collaboration.

Risk – The structure of the university creates a low risk promotion and succession planning model.  Hiring decisions are made by many individuals as a group and are not taken lightly.

Performance Management – Performance management varies in that some degree of output and input is necessary in the operation of the library and its departments.

Talent Management Process – The process is explicit to those who are within the talent pool, but more vague to those outside of it.  While the procedural documentation does exist, those who are non-facutly members do not generally read the faculty manual in order to discern what the success factors of being faculty would entail.

Use of technology – Counter-intuitively, technology is rarely used in the talent management system.  It is upon managers to communicate with employees directly and use paper based evaluation processes to determine the success of the talent pool.  Within the development aspect, however, technology is used as a learning method.

Systems Flexibility – At this point the system is somewhat inflexible.  University protocols call for certain measures to be taken and for the most part, status quo remains the norm for talent management, except for on a case by case basis.

Ownership of talent – The division wants its talent to flourish, but ultimately, it falls on the employee to produce results.  Front line managers may play an encouraging role, but it is up to the employee to fulfill all of the requirements and expectations of their role in order to succeed and move on in the organization.

Advertisements

As weighty a project as it might seem, reading can be quite beneficial to career growth, and even career maintenance.

I’ve been doing a bit of reading recently, and volunteering to do a bit more reading for my department.  As a junior professional (or sub-junior really), this is one of the best things I can do to further my knowledge base in Human Resources, and I urge anyone who wishes to grow in their careers to do the same.  Not only am I gleaning more information from reading than I would by simply going about my daily routine, but I have also begun to see how this helps to set me apart from my equals.

In being willing to take time out of my day, not my work hours, I have unwittingly been making a statement that I am serious about what it is that we do in HR.  My HR Director is in the process of revamping learning opportunities for our employees, and one of his new initiatives is to update his bookshelf with some resources that would benefit him, the HR team, and our staff as well.  He is trying to get comprehensive knowledge of what information is in the texts so that he has a clear picture of what to recommend under many situations.

While talking to me about his plans and placing new books on his shelf, I commented that I had read some of them, and was truly planning to read others.  These were texts such as “Who Moved My Cheese,” “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People,” “Outliers,” and “The Five Dysfunctions of a Team,” among others.  After that, I began to see a noticable change in his demeanor.  He was clearly impressed that I had taken it upon myself to familiarize myself with these texts.  I was able to reach a new level of respect with him than I had before.

Now I’ve volunteered to read “HR Scorecard,” and I will be presenting a book report of sorts to the group at an upcoming meeting.  Already it has brought up the ever-present truth that HR needs to be a strategic partner with upper management to accomplish company goals and objectives.  I am sure there will be some nuggets from this book that I can bring to you as readers. 

But back to the point at hand, surely my own reading has influenced the way I analyze some of the issues that I come across in my daily operations, but also in the contributions I have to my team members through better performance and improved communications in meetings.  Without knowing it, I have been leveraging my way into a better standing within my department and within the greater path of my career development.  If only to emerse myself in the buzz words of my industry, I am holding myself accountable for my career growth.

If I could give any advice on the matter, I would suggest to those who are still in lower ranking positions to take advantage of any and all of the magazines and books you have at your disposal.  Do it now while you are still able to find the time in your day to do it.  As soon as you start rising up in the ranks, job responsibilities take a greater toll on your time, your share of thought, your energy and your free time.  The more that you can read now, the more likely you will be prepared for those higher level positions.  It’s really win-win situation.  Spend the time now, reap the benefits both now and latter.

However, if there are any high levels reading this, try not to give up on reading so easily.  As I am sure you are aware, you will serve your company best if you are on top of the most current news and developments within your field and within your function.  Keep it up, and you will be sure to prove yourself an asset to your organization.

The start of a blog is a new adventure for me.  I’ve never really done this before, so forgive my noob tendencies – I’m sure they will present themselves pretty frequently.  But the true purpose of delving into this world is for my own self-fulfillment.  I am a young professional, often getting too far ahead of myself, and I’d like a place to develop my professional voice, mindset, and overall share of thought.   My field?  Human Resources.  As a current Human Resources Assistant, I’m truely at the bottom of the barrel, but I know I am capable and can grow within the field.  My true interest lies in a mishmash of Training, Coaching, Talent Management, Change Management, and Organizational Development. 

Therefore, as I delve into learning more about the track that I am on, I hope that you, reader (if you exist) bare with me, pitch in when you want to give your two cents on a matter, and hopefully grow with me.  I hope to really bring some thought provoking ideas to this board, and I won’t stop until I have some solid information under my belt.  With the help of SHRM, ASTD, the Harvard Business Review, Professional Development courses and a massive library at my disposal, research is at my fingertips, and hopefully I can put something of what I learn to good use – if not for me, then for some reader out there without these resources.