HR Learner in Development

Posts Tagged ‘Benefits

A recent issue of Parents Magazine published an article about maternity leaves and the importance of knowing your rights under the Family Medical Leave Act, or as most would call FMLA. As both a mother recently returned from my maternity leave and the point person for Leave Management for my Division, I could not agree with the need for this type of reminder more. So I hope you don’t mind me piggy-backing to spend a little time discussing leave management.

My role leave management role withing the Division sounds simple.  Track people’s leaves.  Mark leaves accurately in time sheets.  Process any actions related to pay changes in our HR Information System.  Where it gets complicated is when people don’t follow policy, don’t know that they can take leaves, or don’t know that they actually have to let us when when they return.

For just a little bit of information on FMLA, it protects an individual’s job from being taken away if he or she needs to take some time away from the office to tend to a medical condition, for self or for a family member.  Every company with at least 50 employees working within a 75 mile radius (the specifications get more granular than this but I don’t want to bore you) must grant 12 weeks of unpaid protected time to any employee who has worked at least 12 months and1,250 hours within the last 12 months before the leave.  This protects individuals who are out for a continuous amount of time (surgery and recovery, including delivery of a child), as well as intermittent time (regularly occurring symptoms & scheduled doctors visits to treat).  While every company falling under the guidelines must give this time by law, some go above and beyond to allow some, all, or even more than this time to be paid time.

Other laws, like the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) protect disability leaves, and require organizations to provide reasonable accommodations to those with disabilities, including extending potential leave time.

In HR, we need an accurate picture of who is out and when so that we can have each individual paid correctly, as well as to potentially provide support to any department in need of additional assistance.  In all honesty, we do not need to know why an individual is out, and sometimes it is better if we don’t know, but we do need to know how it affects the work that the individual does on a daily basis.  Therefore, it is important that we receive doctors notes, not to police, but out of concern for the healing individual.  We want to see proof that the individual is ready to return and able to do the job they were assigned, and if there are any tasks that an individual can still not do as a result of their recovery or continued impairment, we need to not take any retaliatory actions against the employee for not doing what they used to be capable of doing.  No, we don’t want to get sued, but we also really want the employee to be healthy and well, too.

Not all leaves are created equal, but tracking them all is very important


It is also true, however, that people can take advantage of company leave policies.  It then becomes important to know when an individual was out, whether it was protected or unprotected time, and whether they followed the procedure for requesting and notifying the proper people at the right times in order to determine whether coaching conversations or disciplinary actions need to take place.

Ultimately, the organizations that respect individuals leaves will see a better uptick in loyalty from those people who took leaves.  The more generous a leave policy is, though, does not translate to greater and greater loyalty.  There must be a line where employees know they can not take advantage of the organizations generosity.  Organizations benefit from healthy workers.  But unhealthy workers can benefit from being under the wing of a healthy organization.

Take some time to review the leave policies in your department, organization, state, and federal area.  What you find may give you peace of mind, or may show you where you can help illuminate a potential growth area.  Stay healthy! But if you can’t, know your rights.

Advertisements

I suggested a while back to take several steps in career development to encourage career growth and satisfaction. A note of caution is that too much focus on developing your career, or any other activity, could have a propensity to be self-destructive, even if it is what you most wanted or loved from your job.Whether you work in a field which requires a large emotional capacity, large intellectual capacity, or large physical capacity, the body and mind can easily be overtaxed if you do not allow it the proper rest.  This is even clear over the course of a work day or work week – you will feel drained by a demanding time.  To avoid this, you can do several things:  

1.  Eat well  

2.  Get plenty of sleep – During sleep, the body has a chance to re-energize and the mind can organize everything you have learned  

3.  Take mini-breaks – During the course of the day, if your work environment allows it, rest your mind by thinking of something non-work related, even if that means having a fun conversation with a co-worker.  Take a coffee break, go for  a walk, do whatever you need to do to break the constant flow of work thoughts.  Believe it or not, you will return to work more energized and more on your game than if you had been focused on the work all day long.   

4. Use your vacation and personal days – For goodness sakes, please!  If this is a benefit within your company, use it.  Get away from the “But my role is vital,” or “Things will just pile up while I’m away” thinking.  Believe me I’ve heard it.  And I’ve also heard, from the same people, that taking that day away or that week away, unplugged, was re-energizing and made them more efficient upon their return.   

All in all, know your limits.  If it is a busy time in your life, adding more to the mix will not necessarily help you.  Keep this in mind as you add development activities to your routine.  Striking the proper balance will get you far.

Be on the lookout for employees to pack up and leave. Keep your team feeling appreciated and challenged to reduce the risk of mass exodus.

A lot of businesses and organizations have seen an increased number of people willing to stay with the company for longer periods of time over the past year or so. 

As the economy starts to improve and people feel more comfortable with the job market, people are likely to start looking around again.  The challenge of the company to retain these valuable resources, or when all else fails, to find better ways to make their talent’s knowledge transferable.

 Unfortunately for organizations, if they haven’t made steps to retain by this point, they are in serious risk of loosing a good number of employees in the near future.  During a period of recession, it is in the best interest of the company to train and cultivate their talent.  If employees are being retained for longer periods of time, people understand their jobs better, and they understand their role within the company.  The true struggle is for the company to get the employees to buy in to their mission, or even just their benefits.

Several key ways to retain your ‘flight risks’ are to:

1.  Identify potential flight risks – It sounds simple, but identifying the groups that are more prone to leave is a vital part in identifying ways of retaining them. 

2.  Identify the needs of these groups – Whether that be more money, more responsibility, more time off, or what have you, try to glean this information from your talent.

3.  Identify the needs of the company – During the economic realities of today, the company may not  be able to support of the needs of those the company wishes to attain.  However, recognizing the amount of latitude a company’s budget and resources has can really point to what can still be done to reward, recognize, and support that talent group.

4.  Review the strategic goals of the company and the department.  If you don’t know what they are, find out.  If the strategy is poorly defined, clarify and make it strong.  In reviewing the strategies, identify areas which can be enhanced.  Don’t be afraid to think outside of the box.  Your company may have had to downsize due to economic hardships over the past few months.  You may be tempted to recreate the same structure when the economy does improve, but don’t.  Realize that you now have solid talent that has been with the company for a good amount of time, most likely performing the same tasks for a long time and more.  Some of these people may now be qualified for a position twice the level they are in currently.  Take advantage of their specialties and their knowledge of the company, and restructure in a way that gives the company a better edge.

5.  Align the needs of the individuals with the strategic goals of the company – While the money might not be in place to move your talent to roles which would meet their career goals and intellectual needs, identifying the potentials and giving them the support that they need to get to that future state now will improve the chances that when the growth can be made, the talent is already in place to move up.

6.  Show them you care – By doing the steps above and more, you will be showing your talent pool that you appreciate them and would like them to continue.