HR Learner in Development

Interviewing: Time is Money Friend

Posted on: January 14, 2011

Waiting for that phone call from a possible employer can be painful, and so can waiting for a response from a perspective employee. Give each other a break and respect the other's time and effort in the recruitment/interview process.

So you’ve been fired. . . just kidding (you know what I’m talking about if you read my most recent post at http://wp.me/pOkV2-19).  Due to the recession, a lot of people are still out of jobs going in to the new year. Other’s have been in the same roles for longer than anticipated because the applicant pool is much more experienced than has been in the past.  This may or may not continue on to the new year.  So if you are in the market for a new job, I have a few things to say.

Don’t waste the employer’s time and don’t waste your time. Go forward with defined goals and objectives for what type of role you are looking for in a set of companies or industries you would be comfortable.  While the best match tends to be for a role equal to or just above the one you are leaving within a similar company or industry, many jobs have cross-functionality across industries.  Look at your strengths, hopefully attached to behaviors and tasks you have completed in the past, and look at what you would like for yourself in the future.  Going from there, search for jobs you are qualified for.  Actually read the job description and most if not all job qualifications.  In an environment like this one, you are most likely to land an interview if you are partially overqualified for the role.  Don’t get disheartened if this is not you.  Again stick to your strengths and let them shine.

One piece of advice for the average job posting website is to really go through and label your priorities within the jobs you are qualified for.  A – Would really love this job.  B – I could do this job.  C – I can do it, so just give me the money.  Discard all C level jobs.  You don’t need to limit yourself to being tortured day in and day out with a tiring meaningless job if you don’t need to.  Apply to A’s and B’s.  If offered an interview for a B level category, take a little bit of time assessing if you could be happy in this job or with this company.  If the answer turns out to be no, don’t waste the company’s time and don’t waste your time.  While a practice interview could be benficial here or there, practice with a friend, not with a department who may in fact actually want to work with you.  You don’t need to string them along.

Employers.  Same goes for you.  I’ve seen several instances of ‘pity’ interviews.  Some of them actually pan out, but most of them don’t.  If you are going to take the time to bring someone in for an interview, even if you think someone else may be more qualified on paper, you must give them a fair and even shot.  The trick here is that interviewers are instructed to ask the same questions to all candidates.  You should not short change the guy who rubs you the wrong way, unless you truely fear for your well being of course.  If you get a sense from the candidate that they don’t want to be there, or they don’t really want the job, ask them!  You may be surprised by what you hear, and you might end up saving some time.

Let me bring you back to a job interview I had once.  I was looking for a job which would teach me more about Human Resources.  The job listing was for a Recruitment Coordinator.  I applied and was called in.  Getting to the office, I quickly began to see that this recruitment agency was heavily sales oriented.  Now I had previously had a short span of sales experience and enjoyed the work.  The atmosphere seemed to be very similar to that sales job I had held, and I could feel the energy in the room.  However, I wanted to learn something new.  Recruitment as sales wasn’t what I had had in mind for this next step in my career.  In the interview room, the interviewer asked why I wanted the job, almost right away, and I told him point blank, “I see that this is a very sales based job and that’s not what I’m looking for right now.”  He appreciated my honesty, and appreciated me not wasting his time.  He was able to get back to what was surely a busy day on the phone with companies and in person with candidates.  Together, we saved eachother time.

On a side note, employers, if you know that you are not going to go ahead with a particular candidate, let them know as soon as you can.  Don’t let them wait in limbo, assuming the job is still available to them.  Give them a fair chance to get moving onto the next application process.  Give them a call, shoot them an email, write them a letter.  Thank them for their time.  And let them get on with their lives.

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1 Response to "Interviewing: Time is Money Friend"

Great pieces of wisdom in your post. I’d also recomend they read “48 Days to the Work You Love” by Dan Miller

Good luck on the Post a Week goal for the year.

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